The following articles are contained in CJ

111.2

Abstracts of Articles

CANNIBAL DEMETER (PIND. OL. 1.52) AND THE THESMOPHORIA PIGS

by R. Drew Griffith
Abstract:

At the Thesmophoria women drew up from chasms the rotten remains of pigs, which, when mixed with seed, were supposed to ensure a good crop. Greeks said this honored the swineherd Eubuleus, swallowed up when Pluto abducted Persephone, but modern scholars seek a better explanation.  I offer two:  first the pigs symbolize Demeter’s genitals.  Second, in the highlands of Papua New Guinea, when a man dies, his tribesmen invite women to eat the dead man’s flesh along with pork. Demeter herself once ate human flesh, which is metaphorically a kind of pork. I suggest, therefore, that the story about Pelops is a charter-myth for the Thesmophoria pigs.

DECIMATION IN THE ROMAN REPUBLIC

by Charles Goldberg
Abstract:

Decimatio, or executing a portion, usually a tenth, of a Roman legionary unit, is regarded as a quintessential example of old-fashioned military discipline. It is nonetheless poorly attested in the earlier Republic, though in the first century we find more instances. This paper examines its literary manifestations and scrutinizes its historicity. By considering soldiers’ access to provocatio, cultural and legal prescripts on subjecting citizens to corporal punishment, military demography, and civil war crises, it argues that decimatio went into disuse in the wake of legislation de provocatione by the 130s BCE, and was used again in the Late Republic.

HOW TO MAKE A ROMAN DEMOSTHENES: SELF-FASHIONING IN CICERO’S BRUTUS AND ORATOR

by Caroline Bishop
Abstract:

ThisarticlearguesthatCicero’suseofDemosthenesinhisBrutus andOratorshouldbereadinlightofCaesar’sdictatorship.AnexaminationofDemosthenes’Hellenisticreceptionrevealsthat hissignificance in the Greek worldcentered on hisrhetoricalprowessandhis(failed)opposition,asthelastoratorofdemocraticAthens,tothetyrannyofPhilip.Cicero,whonowsawhimselfasthelastoratorofrepublicanRome,wantedtoberememberedinthesameway.ForthisreasonhedrewdeliberateparallelsbetweenhiscareerandDemosthenes’inthesetwoworks,layingthegroundworkfortheassociationshedrewoninthePhilippicsandestablishing acomparisonthatpersiststothisday.

MONSTRUOSA SPECIES: SCYLLA, SPARTACUS, SEXTUS POMPEIUS AND CIVIL WAR IN SALLUST'S HISTORIES

by Jennifer Gerrish
Abstract:

Through the figure of Scylla, Sallust evokes Sextus Pompeius as part of his critique of contemporary politics. Although the Histories narrate the years following Sulla’s death, they are an allegorical critique of Sallust’s own world. Scylla appears in an excursus on Sicily in Sallust’s account of the Spartacus War. Although the Spartacus War taxed Rome for three years, the state downplayed the threat posed to the security of the republic. Likewise, the triumvirs downplayed Sextus’ threat by portraying him as a mere pirate. Sallust evokes Sextus in the context of the Spartacus War to suggest that, despite the triumvirs’ dissimulation, Sextus was a threat, and that the state was as unstable during the triumviral years as it was during those turbulent years after Sulla’s death.